People

Alexis Alabastro, M.A.: Alexis examines resistance to social influence and persuasion, and holds a strong interest in research methodology and statistical analysis. Her current research includes a study on persuasive sarcasm, minority influence, and the black sheep effect. She also collaborates with other research assistants to investigate components involved in adolescents’ resistance to persuasive anti-drug campaigns and is responsible for designing and executing research using the National Survey of Parents and Youth (NSPY).

Alabastro, A. B., Rast, D. E. III, Lac, A., Hogg, M. A., & Crano. W. D. (in press). Intergroup bias and perceived similarity: The effects of successes and failures on support for in- and outgroup political leaders. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations.

Alabastro, A., Beleva, Y., & Crano, W. D. (2012, January) Why Sarcasm Works: Comparing Sarcastic versus Direct Anti-Drug Messages. Poster presentation at the annual meeting at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP), San Diego, CA.

Lisha, N. E., Alabastro, A. B., Johnson, I. M. (2009, May). Marijuana Use and Adolescent Athletes: The Mediating Effects of Perceived Group Norms. Poster presentation at the annual meeting at the Association for Psychological Science (APS), San Francisco, CA.

 

Tatiana Basáñez, M.A., studies intergroup processes and health disparities with a focus on persuasion and Hispanics.  She has investigated acculturation and substance abuse and is now seeking to apply research from embodiment and implicit cognitions to health and academic achievement interventions.

 

Basáñez, T. Unger, J. B., Soto, D., Crano, W. D., Baezconde-Garbanati, L. (2012). Perceived discrimination as a risk factor for depressive symptoms and substance use among Hispanic adolescents in Los Angeles. Ethncity & Health. doi: 10.1080/13557858.2012.713093

Basáñez, T., Blanco, L., Collazo, J. L., Berger, D. E., Crano, W. D. (2013). Ethnic groups’ perception of physicians’ attentiveness: Implications for health and obesity. Psychology, Health & Medicine, 18(1), 37-46. 

Basáñez, T., Dennis, J. M., Crano, W. D., Stacy, A., Unger, J. B. (In Press). Measuring acculturation gap conflicts among Hispanics: Implications for psychosocial and academic adjustment. Journal of Family Issues.

Lac, A. , Unger, J. B., Basáñez, T., Ritt-Olson, A., Soto, D., & Baezconde-Garbanati, L., (2011). Marijuana use among Hispanic adolescents: Protective familial factors and gender differences. Substance Use and Misuse, 46(5), 644-655.

Dennis, J. M., Basáñez, T., & Farhamand, A. (2010). Intergenerational conflicts among Latinos in early adulthood: Separating values conflicts with parents from acculturation conflicts. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 32, 118-135.

 

Yuliyana Beleva: Yuliyana’s research focuses on persuasion and attitude change in health-related settings, as well as using the power of mass media to promote healthy behaviors. She is interested in applying theoretical frameworks from psychology to increase the effectiveness of health communications and develop social marketing campaigns. Currently, she studies at-risk adolescents’ motivation to accept or reject persuasive messages related to obesity and drug abuse.

Beleva, Y. D., Hohman, Z., & Crano, W. D. (under review). The effect of invisible narrators in PSAs targeting adolescent marijuana use. Health Communications Journal.

Beleva, Y. D., & Siegel, J. T.  (in preparation). Persuasion in a heightened drive state:  the effect of perceived knowledge on the processing of relevant information.

Alabastro, A. B., & Beleva, Y. D., & Crano, W. D. (2012). Why Sarcasm Works: Comparing sarcastic versus direst anti-drug messages. A poster presentation at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) annual conference, January 2012, San Diego, CA.

Miller, S., Beleva, Y. D., Garner, L. Zaver, A., & Mayer, L. (2012). Ego depletion inventory: developing a scale of current ego depletion. A poster presentation at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) annual conference, January 2012, San Diego, CA.

Beleva, Y. D., & Siegel, J. T. (2012). The purpose of harming oneself: Goal Disruption Theory. Symposium presentation at the Western Psychological Association annual conference, April, 2012, San Francisco, CA.

Beleva, Y. D., Crano, W. D. & Hohman, Z. (2012). The effect of invisible narrators in PSAs targeting adolescent marijuana use. Symposium presentation at the Western Psychological Association annual conference, April, 2012, San Francisco, CA.

Beleva, Y. D. (2012). The effect of invisible narrators in PSAs targeting adolescent marijuana use. International Communications Association 2012 conference, “Communication and Community”, Phoenix, AR.

Massie, K., Beleva, Y., Pike, J., Cen, S., Reynolds, K. (under review) A Multi-level school-based recruitment approach in an adolescent obesity prevention study. Preventing Chronic Disease Journal.

Grenard, J. L., Stacy, A. W., Shiffman, S., Baraldi, A. N., MacKinnon, D. P., Lockhart, G., Kisbu-Sakarya, Y., Boyle, S., Beleva, Y., Koprowski, C., Ames, S. L., Reynolds, K. D. (under review). Sweetened drink and snacking cues in adolescents: a study using ecological momentary assessment. Appetite.

 

Coral M. Bruni, M.A., is a Ph.D. student in the applied social psychology program at Claremont Graduate University. She is interested in implicit social cognition and conservation psychology. Her current research focuses on applying Greenwald’s unified theory of implicit attitudes, stereotypes, self-esteem, and self-concept to implicit environmental identities. In addition, she is interested in the psychometric properties of a game version of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and the development of environmental attitudes, particularly from childhood to adulthood.

Bruni, C. M., Chance, R., & Schultz, P. W. (In Press). Measuring value-based environmental concerns in children: An Environmental Motives Scale. The Journal of Environmental Education. 

Bruni, C. M., Chance, R., Schultz, P. W., & Nolan, J. (In Press). Natural connections: Bees sting and snakes bite, but they are still nature. Environment and Behavior.

Bruni, C. M., & Schultz, P. W. (2010). Implicit beliefs about self and nature: Evidence from an IAT game. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 30, 95-102.

Bruni, C. M., Fraser, J., & Schultz, P. W. (2008). The value of zoo experiences for developing implicit connections with nature. Journal of Visitor Studies, 11, 139-150.

 

Candice Donaldson: Candice D. Donaldson is a Ph.D. student in the applied social psychology program, specializing in health behavior. She is interested in topics such as motivation, attitude change, persuasion, health behavior change, and adolescent deviance, psychosocial development, and substance use. She is currently studying the predictors of prescription opioid and stimulant misuse among adolescent populations. She is also working as an Assistant Project Manager on a grant funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse that is focused on understanding and overcoming adolescent resistance to anti-marijuana ads by tailoring persuasive appeals based on characteristics of the message receiver.

Sara Hollar: Sara is a first year Ph.D Social Psychology Student. She’s currently studying the effects of goal disruption, as well as messages that may increase help seeking among people with depression.

 

 

Lori Garner, M.A.: Lori’s research focuses primarily on risk perception and applying social psychological principles in the development of risk-moderating messages. Specifically, she studies risk perceptions regarding and subsequent decision making about health and prosocial behaviors such as organ donation registration. She also studies the role of social context on risk perceptions and behavioral responses to threat.

Miller, S., Beleva, Y., & Garner, L. (2011). Ego depletion inventory: developing a scale of current ego depletion. Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) annual conference, January 2012, San Diego, CA.

 

Jessica Jackson is interested in the creation and evaluation of public health services, prevention, and intervention efforts for African Americans. Her research interests include: disparities in the treatment of co-occurring disorders in African Americans, iatrophobia and cultural mistrust in health care settings, and culturally responsive interventions for preventing HIV/AIDS. 

 

Ian Johnson, M.A.  is studying attitude-behavior consistency and ways to increase (pro-health) attitude-behavior consistency through persuasive messages. Ian is also interested in preventing and curbing adolescent drug use via media campaigns, reactance, motivations for nonmedical prescription drug use, and differences in perceived norms surrounding prescription and illicit drugs.

Alvaro, E.A., Crano, W.D., Siegel, J.T, Hohman, Z., Johnson, I. & Nakawaki, B. (in press). NSPY Ad evaluation, marijuana use status, and future marijuana use. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors.

Johnson, I., Siegel, J. T., & Crano, W. D. (in press). Expanding the reach of vested interest in predicting attitude-consistent behavior. Social Influence.

Johnson, I., Siegel, J. T., & Crano, W. D. (2012, July). Indirect Vested Interest: Interpersonal Closeness as a Moderator of Attitude-Behavior Consistency. Conference of the International Association for Relationship Research: Chicago, IL.

Johnson, I., Seifert, B., Siegel, J. T., & Crano, W. D. (2010, June). Vicarious Vested Interest: Expanding Vested Interest Theory. Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, 2010 Biennial Conference: New Orleans, LA.

Lisha, N. E., Alabastro, A., & Johnson, I. (2009, May). Marijuana use and adolescent athletes: The mediating effects of perceived group. Poster presented at the Association for Psychological Science, 2009 Conference: San Francisco, CA.

 

Amanda Keeler, M.A.: Amanda is interested in applying social psychological theories to health promotion. Her current research focuses on encouraging depressed Hispanic populations to seek help from their loved ones by addressing common barriers such as stigma, efficacy, and behavioral capabilities. In addition, she is interested in HIV education and prevention for at risk populations.

 

Keeler, A. R., Siegel, J. T., & Alvaro, E. (under review). Depression, familism, and help seeking perceptions of Hispanics: Meditational elucidation with implications for intervention. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health.

Nydegger, L. A., Keeler, A. R., Siegel, J. T., Hood, C, & Stacy, A. (under review).Addressing HIV misconceptions & condom implementation intentions among drug users. AIDS Care.

Keeler, A. R., Siegel, J. T., & Alvaro, E. (2012). “Depression, familism, and help seeking perceptions of Hispanics: Meditational elucidation with implications for intervention”. Depression Symposium for Western Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA.

Nydegger, L. A., & Keeler, A. R. (2011).“Reducing misconceptions and increasing implementation intentions to use condoms in high risk adults in drug diversion programs.” Poster presentation for the American Public Health Association annual conference, October 2011,Washington, D.C.

Keeler, A. & Crano, W. “Exploration of Help Seeking from a Biopsychosocial Perspective” (paper presentation). Western Psychological Association (WPA) annual conference, April 2011, Los Angeles, CA.

Keeler, A., Gonzalez, A., Siegel, J., & Alvaro, E. Depression Symposium “The relationship between negative self-bias on help seeking among depressed Hispanic individuals” Western Psychological Association (WPA) annual conference, April 2010, Cancun, Mexico.

 

Chris Lamb. Chris is most interested in interpersonal dynamics and how our social relationships influence our attitudes and behaviors (e.g. how parent expectancies can influence youth marijuana use); he is also interested in the application of research exploring prominent social issues, health behavior, and education. Chris is currently exploring how people conceptually understand marriage and the malleability of attitudes toward same-sex marriage. He is concluding an international study exploring the attitudes toward adoption of students in Europe and the United States training in the applied sciences.

Lienemann, B.A. & Lamb, C.S. (In Press) Heavy episodic drinking in college females: An exploration of expectancies, consequences, and self-efficacy.

Lamb, C.S. & Crano, W.D. (Submitted) Parental self-fulfilling prophecies and children’s marijuana use.

Lamb, C.S., Lienemann, B.A., & Crano, W.D. (Submitted) Exploring marriage: Categories and differences between same- and different-sex marriage types.

Lienemann, B.A., Lamb, C.S. & Crano, W.D.  (Submitted) The relationship between loneliness and risky sexual behavior among U.S. adults: The mediation effects of anxiety, alcohol intoxication, and sexual compulsivity.

 

Brianna Alyssa Lienemann, M.A.: Brianna is a Social Psychology and Health Psychology doctoral student. Her research interests focus on improving stigma, attitudes, intentions, and behavior related to depression, suicide, and substance use. This is achieved through the application of persuasion and psychological theories to the creation and evaluation of public service announcements.

Lamb, C.S., Lienemann, B.A., & Crano, W.D. (under review). Exploring the concept of marriage: Categories and differences between same-sex and other-sex marriage types.

Lienemann, B.A., & Lamb, C.S. (2012). Heavy episodic drinking among college females: An exploration of expectancies, consequences and self-efficacy. Substance Use & Misuse, Early Online, 1-9. doi: 10.3109/10826084.2012.726311

Lienemann, B.A. & Siegel, J.T. (under review). Reactance to depression public service announcements among people with depression.

Lienemann, B.A., Siegel, J.T., & Crano, W.D. (2012). Persuading depressed individuals to seek help: Respect the boomerang. Health Communication. doi: 10.1080/10410236.2012.712091

Lienemann, B.A., & Stopp, H. (in press). The association between media exposure of interracial relationships and attitudes toward interracial relationships. Journal of Applied Social Psychology.

Siegel, J.T., Alvaro, E.M., Crano, W.D., Lienemann, B., Hohman, Z., & O’Brien, E. (2012). Increasing social support for depressed individuals: A cross-cultural assessment of an affect-expectancy approach. Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives, 17, 713-732. doi: 10.1080/10810730.2011.635775

Siegel, J.T., Lienemann, B.A., & Tan, C. (under review). The overheard communication technique: Influencing people with depression to seek help.

 

Elena A. Lyrintzis: Elena is currently interested in applying social psychological principles to health behaviors, specifically the nonmedical use of prescription drugs. Her other research interests include motivation, emotion, and social influence.

 

Lyrintzis, E. A. & Siegel, J. T. (2012, April). Academic Disruption: An application of Goal Disruption Theory. Paper presented at Western Psychological Association Annual Convention, San Francisco, CA.

Siegel, J. T. & Lyrintzis, E. A. (2012, April). The development and validation of brief measures of psychological disequilibrium. Paper presented at Western Psychological Association Annual Convention, San Francisco, CA.

 

Mario Navarro is interested in health behavior and health promotion specifically in the realm of organ donation. His research interests include attitude-behavior consistency and purposive behavior within the total adult population and familiasm and abnegation within Hispanic populations.

 

Navarro, M. & Siegel, J.T. (in preparation). Manipulating disruption: A test of Disruption Drive Theory.

Siegel, J. T., Rosenberg, B., Navarro, M., Lyrintzis, E., Beleva, Y. (2012). Goal Disruption Theory: A Tolmanian Framework. Western Psychological Association (WPA) annual conference, April 2012, San Francisco, CA.

Tan, C., Navarro, M., & Siegel, J. T. (2012). Potential, felt, and anticipated ambivalence: Attitude-behavior consistency and organ donor registration. Western Psychological Association (WPA) annual conference, April 2012, San Francisco, CA.

 

Erin K. O’Brien, M.A. Erin is interested in understanding why many large-scale health campaigns do not work, and proposes that this is because their targets are experiencing psychological bleakness, which reduces their likelihood of processing health information. Erin is also interested in studying the relationship between culture and health—how health behaviors are perceived differently based on culture. She is particularly interested in understanding what factors account for Latino health disparities and Latino health advantages.

OBrien, E.K., & Siegel,  J.T. (2012). Development of a Bleakness Scale. Paper Presentation, Western Psychological Association Conference, San Francisco, CA.

O’Brien, E.K., & Rosenberg, B. (2012). A Typology of Health Behavior Change. Poster Presentation, Western Psychological Association Conference, San Francisco, CA. 

Siegel, J.T., O’Brien, E.K., Alvaro, E.M. (under review). Barriers to living donation among low-resource Latinos: “…they have to worry about their work, their family, how to survive.” American Journal of Transplantation.

Gonzalez, A.V , Siegel, J.T,  Alvaro, E.M., & O’Brien, E.K. (in press). Depression and Physician Patient Communication Among Hispanic End-Stage Renal Disease Patients.  Journal of Health Communication.

 

Benjamin D. Rosenberg, M.A., Adjunct prof at California State University — Dominguez Hills. Ben is in interested in applying social psychological and communication research to address social and health problems. Particularly, Ben’s research focuses on health attitudes, messaging, and persuasion; adolescent obesity; heightened drive state; and the interplay between technology and behavior.

 

Rosenberg, B.D. & Siegel, J.T. (in preparation). Purposive behavior and social influence: A new way to persuade.

Rosenberg, B. D., Lewandowski, J., & Siegel, J. T. (under review). Mixed mode surveys and the creation of profiles:  Military personnel, goal disruption theory, and a modicum of qualitative data. Journal of Mixed Methods Research.

Lewandowski, J., Rosenberg, B. D., Parks, M. J., & Siegel, J. T. (2011). The effect of informal social support: Face-to-face versus computer-mediated communication. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 1806-1814.

Lewandowski, J., Rosenberg, B. D., Parks, M. J., & Siegel, J. T. (2011). The effect of informal social support: Face-to-face versus computer-mediated communication. Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) annual conference, January 2011, San Antonio, TX.

Rosenberg, B. D., Lewandowski, J., & Siegel, J. T. (2011). Desired end-states of military personnel: A mixed-methods analysis. Western Psychological Association (WPA) annual conference, April 2011, Los Angeles, CA.

 

Andi Ruybal: Andi is a PhD student in Applied Social Psychology. Her research interests include, minority student achievement, depression among minority populations, stereotype threat, health psychology, and persuasion. She is currently researching how stigma and attribution may negatively affect whether or not women will seek help for postpartum depression.

 

Cara N. Tan, M.A.: Cara is interested in exploring the variables that influence the consistency of attitudes and behavior with a special focus on prosocial behavior.  Her current research is focused on understanding the relationship between vested interest and attitude strength.  She is also interested in developing new methods of persuasion based on attitude strength to promote positive health behavior and prosocial behavior.

Siegel, J. T., Lienemann, B. A., Tan, C. N. (under review). Influencing the depressed via overheard communication. Journal of Abnormal Psychology

Tan, C. N., Navarro, M. A., Siegel, J. T. (2012) Ambivalence and attitude behavior consistency in organ donation registration. Symposium presentation at the 2012 Western Psychological Association annual conference.

Tan, C. N., & Crano, W. D. (2012). Fear arousal: Avoidance and punishment in anti-marijuana advertisements. Symposium presentation at the 2012 Western Psychological Association annual conference.

Siegel, J. T., Lienemann, B. A. & Tan, C. N. (2012). Reducing self-stigma of help seeking among depressed people: An application of Walster and Festinger’s overheard communication technique.  Symposium presentation at the 2012 Western Psychological Association annual conference.

 

Julia Tang, MA, MSW, is a doctoral developmental psychology student interested in understanding how decision making about health behaviors occur during the transition between adolescence to adulthood. Julia’s past research has also involved examining needs of cancer patients and survivors and the relationship between health related quality of life (HRQOL) and survivorship. She is currently working on studying the trajectories of healthy and health risk behaviors during adolescence and young adulthood using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health).

Ashing-Giwa, K., Lim, J., & Tang, J. (2010). Surviving cervical cancer: Does health related quality of life influence survival? Gyneocologic Oncology, 118(1), 35-42.

Tang, J. & Siegel, J. (2010). Risk Taking as Response to Mental Constriction. Poster presented at Western Psychological Association Conference in Cancun, Mexico.

Siegel, J.T., Alvaro, E.M., Crano, W.D., Gonzalez, A., Tang, J.C., Jones, S.P. (2010). Passive positive organ donor registration behavior. A mixed method assessment of the IIFF Model. Psychology, Health & Medicine, 15(2), 198-209.

Zebrack, B., Bleyer, A., Albritton, K., Medearis, S. & Tang, J.C. (2006). Assessing the healthcare needs of adolescent and young adult cancer patients and survivors. Cancer, 107(12), 2915-2923.

 

Emily Warren. Emily is a first year Ph.D. student in Social Psychology. She earned her Masters degree here at SBOS in Organizational Behavior and decided it was time to get back to her roots. She is currently preparing a paper for submission on the relationship between multitasking behavior and stress in organizations. She and her fellow colleagues are also exploring flow personality and whether this might serve as a buffer to a disruptive experience. This work is being done under Dr. Jason Siegel to further his work in Goal Disruption Theory.